‘Duty-content’ king?

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Image by Bruce MacRae via Flickr

During the workshop of Social Media Club Utrecht, Netherlands, on 29th June 2011 the theme was Social Media and journalism. Elvira van Noort emphasised that during her internship in 2005, various journalists did not believe in internet at all and that the editorial desks of the internet and print departments were separated. Nowadays, the line between journalist work and the citizen or community is getting thin. However, a task of the journalists is to verify and check the content the community provides and thus adding reliability. Turned around, the community can make the journalists work for them by sending messages the journalists should act upon. Aart Lensink of LVB Networks was worried about the ‘duty-content’ – the stream of comparable content that was produced by organisations that want to have content for the sake of it. A blurb of words, optimised to be found in Google but by its un-originality the result was opposite. But do the ‘official’ media loose their position? It is clear that suppliers, the business, seem to get closer to the professionals compared to the professional media which are disappearing. The latter can be caused by the business model of controlled circulation and advertising which declined. When at the same time the suppliers and professionals have the means to share their experience themselves, the parallel movements make that the information structure changes. Forever.

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Journalism 2.0: Social Media Ethics

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Image representing Nathan T. Wright as depicte...

Image via CrunchBase

In the slideshare presentation Journalism 2.0: Social Media Ethics, Nathan T. Wright gives some cues on how to judge and work with sources from social media. This subject is actual as in this kind of cicumstances, social media give often more information. Think of the revolts in Egypt, the news about the Christmas lights at Harrod’s in London, plane crashes and other accidents. The reliability of the sources need checking, probably even more then usual. The challenge is often to find the right person who is a source, place the message in context of what happened. Checking twice or more often is the rule here. Nathan gives some useful handles, also on how to judge images that may be manipulated.

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